Visual Novels and aesthetics in writing

What constitutes as good writing? I know that’s a pretty difficult question to kick us off from, and I’m not about to attempt to find an answer. Though there are some vaguely defined outlines of what makes a good text, a lot of it rests on our own subjectivity, our individual experiences with other works and the knowledge each of us has regarding the subject matter. There are different ways to look at it, certainly. When I say ‘good writing’ to a geek crowd, they immediately take it in terms of plot structure, character arcs, and all the elements that shape the story of a piece of fiction. I can definitely see why it’s so important: if a reader gets invested in your characters and keeps wondering just what is going to happen next, then you’re free to keep writing until someone finally says ‘stop’.

‘But what about the other side of writing?’ I ask. ‘What other side?’ they respond. ‘You know, the aesthetic part, the use of language, the ability to say a lot with only a few words, that sort of thing’. ‘Who the fuck cares about that?’ Continue reading

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Visual Novels and co-authoring

The idea of gathering a number of people with possibly very different styles in order to write for the same story is one I’ve grown to distrust over the years. I can understand it if we’re talking about movie scripts, as most of the time the narrative individuality of a writer is not as important as their ability to produce an interesting plot and convincing dialogue (with the rest of the aesthetic choices being left up to the director), but when it comes to other forms of narrative, particularly those centered heavily around prose, such as a novel, it’s hard for me to believe it’s ever going to turn out alright. It might be a personal thing: I’m not a writer that feels comfortable when there’s another person in charge, one that could potentially alter and completely ruin the way I want my story to be. Suffice to say this fear has led me to stay away from my friends’ jolly D&D sessions. Continue reading